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SISKIYOU UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT has some great resources for for SBAC compiled by Glenn Hervieux.

SBAC Field Test Resource Site

2.0 What is the SBAC Field test?

SBAC Testing Information

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CAASPP: California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress

California Testing in 2015

The California assessments that comprise the 2015 administration are a mix of computer-based and paper-based assessments. The computer-based component is the Smarter Balanced Field Test. The paper-based component includes a mix of legacy Standardized Testing and Reporting assessments.

Smarter Balanced Field Test >

In California, all students in grades 3 through 8, 11, and some students in grades 9 and 10 will participate in the 2014 Smarter Balanced Field Test. No student scores will be produced for these tests, which include both English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics content areas. These tests are administered entirely online.

California Standards Tests (CSTs) >

The CSTs in Science are to be administered to students in grades 5, 8, and 10. Students in grade 11 who are participating in the EAP have the option of taking the CST for English–Language Arts (ELA) (Grade 11) and the CST for Algebra II or Summative High School Mathematics.

California Modified Assessment (CMA) >

The CMA for Science are to be administered to students in grades 5, 8, and 10 who have an individualized education program (IEP). Assignment of the CMA is made in the student’s IEP only; a student’s Section 504 plan is not to be used to assign a student to take the CMA (although accommodations may be named in the Section 504 plan or in the IEP).

California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA) >

The CAPA is an individually administered performance assessment for students in grades 2 through 11 who have significant cognitive disabilities and who are unable to take either the CSTs even with accommodations or modifications or the CMA with accommodations.

Students in grades 5, 8, and 10 who have been assigned to take the CAPA will take the CAPA for Science. All students in grades 2 through 11 who take the CAPA will take the CAPA for English–Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics.

Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS) >

The voluntary STS are multiple-choice tests that allow Spanish-speaking English learners in grades 2 through 11 to demonstrate their knowledge of the California content standards by taking a reading/language arts (RLA) assessment in their primary language. STS items are developed by biliterate, bilingual California educators and test developers. Students in grades 5, 8, and 10 take the STS in addition to, not in place of, the CST or CMA.

Computer-based Smarter Balanced Field Tests:

  • English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics—grades 3–8 and 11 (some schools will also test grades 9 and 10)

Paper-based tests:

  • California Standards Tests (CSTs) for Science—grades 5, 8, and 10
  • California Modified Assessment (CMA) for Science—grades 5, 8, and 10 who meet the eligibility requirements to take this instead of a CST for Science
  • California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA) for Science—grades 5, 8, and 10 who meet the CAPA requirements
  • CAPA for ELA and Mathematics—grades 2–11 who meet the CAPA requirements
  • CSTs for students in grade 11 participating in the Early Assessment Program
  • Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS) for Reading/Language Arts—grades 2–11 (voluntary)

SBAC: Practice Tests

The practice tests were released in the spring of 2013 to provide students with a grade-specific testing experience that is similar in format and structure to the Smarter Balanced assessments. The practice tests include a variety of items (approximately 30 items each in ELA and math) as well as an ELA and math performance task at each grade level (3–8 and 11). Since spring 2013, new features have been added to the practice test, such as Spanish glossaries and American Sign Language videos. During the next several months, additional features will continue to be added. More information on these updates will be provided in April 2014. 

 

For practice tests click on the following link: SBAC: SMARTER BALANCED ASSESSMENT CONSORTIUM PRACTICE TEST

The Practice and Training Tests can be taken on any Internet-connected computer using a current Web browser including:

  • Mozilla Firefox
  • Google Chrome
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 10
  • Apple Safari

 

Calculators are available for students to preview and practice with outside of the testing environment.

SBAC: Smarter Balanced Assessment ConsortiumTesting Schedule for April 20th through May 15th.

Grenada Elementary School SBAC Testing schedule for April/May 2015:

Monday

4/20/15

Tuesday

4/21/15

Wednesday

4/22/15

Thursday

4/23/15

Friday

4/24/15

 

6th grade

PRACTICE TEST

8:30 to recess

 

6th grade

8:30 to recess

 

 

6th grade

8:30 to recess

 

 

6th grade

8:30 to recess

 

 

6th grade

8:30 to recess

 

8th grade

10:00 to 11:15

 

8th grade

10:00 to 11:15

 

 

8th  grade

Recess to lunch

 

 

8th  grade

Recess to lunch

 

 

8th grade

10:00 to 11:15

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

Make ups after lunch

 

Make ups after lunch

 

 

Make ups after lunch

 

 

Make ups after lunch

 

 

Make ups after lunch

 

 

 

Grenada Elementary School Computer Lab/Library Testing schedule for April/May 2015:

Monday

4/27/15

Tuesday

4/28/15

Wednesday

4/29/15

Thursday

4/30/15

Friday

5/1/15

 

6th grade

4th Grade

PRACTICE TEST

8:30 to recess

 

 

6th grade

8:30 to recess

4th grade

 

4th grade

8:30 to recess

4th grade

 

4th grade

8:30 to recess

4th grade

 

6th grade

8:30 to recess

4th grade

 

8th grade

10:00 to 11:15

3rd grade

PRACTICE TEST

 

8th grade

10:00 to 11:15

3rd grade

 

 

3rd grade

Recess to lunch

3rd grade

 

 

3rd grade

Recess to lunch

3rd grade

 

 

8th grade

10:00 to 11:15

3rd grade

 

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

3rd grade

 

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

3rd grade

 

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

3rd grade

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

3rd grade

 

7th grade

11:15 to 12:30

3rd grade

 

 

Make ups after lunch

 

Make ups after lunch

 

 

Make ups after lunch

 

 

Make ups after lunch

 

 

Make ups after lunch

5th grade will test in their classroom on the NetBooks.  

3rd  and 4th will take their tests in the computer lab.

 

Grenada Elementary School Computer Lab/Library Testing schedule for May 2015:

Monday

5/4/14

Tuesday

5/5/14

Wednesday

5/8/14

Thursday

5/9/14

Friday

5/9/14

 

5th grade

8:30 to recess

 

5th grade

8:30 to recess

 

 

5th grade

8:30 to recess

 

 

5th grade

8:30 to recess

 

 

5th grade

8:30 to recess

 

3rd  grade

10:20 to 11:15

 

3rd  grade

10:20 to 11:15

 

3rd  grade

10:20 to 11:15

 

3rd  grade

10:20 to 11:15

 

3rd  grade

10:20 to 11:15

 

3rd  grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

3rd  grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

 

3rd  grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

 

3rd  grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

3rd  grade

11:15 to 12:30

 

Make ups after lunch

 

Make ups after lunch

8th Science

 

Make ups after lunch

8th Science

 

Make ups after lunch

8th Science

 

Make ups after lunch

5th grade will test in their classroom on the NetBooks.  

3rd  and 4th will take their tests  in the computer lab.

8th and 5th will take their paper science tests in their classrooms.


Thank you for all of your effort and flexibility.Note that while the start times are accurate, the ending times may vary. The office will notify the rooms when everyone has reported that their testing is completed for the day.

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE + TEST PREP = SUCCESS (PROFICIENCY)

The GES teaching staff are focusing on helping students learn and retain information, and to be able to transfer this knowledge when taking quizzes and tests, such as the California Standards Test (CST)/STAR, which is given to 2nd - 8th graders in May each school year.  The goal in California is to have all 2nd - 8th grade students perform at the proficient or advanced level.

Teachers focus on having students learn and understand their grade level content standards and help students become better test-takers by giving them tools and practice opportunities during the school year.

If students know their grade level content/subject matter and know how to take a test, then they will do better on a test!

Whether we like it or not, testing is a big part of our lives.  For example, elementary student performance on tests can dictate if a student takes the GATE placement test or which language arts and math classes are taken in middle school and High School.



CDE STAR Website for Parents & Community Members – The California Department of Education (CDE) STAR website  was designed to help parents understand the STAR program to better familiarize their children with testing.  A plethora of information is available on this website, such as sample STAR test questions and what grade level standards are being assessed.  Click here to review sample STAR test questions.  After reviewing this material, you will see why it is important for students to know their grade level content standards and to be able to transfer and apply this information when taking the STAR test.  GES teachers use various sample test questions and teach various strategies during the school year to help students become better test-takers.


STAR CST Blueprints – Click here to review the number of questions on the STAR test for each specific grade level Content Standard.  For example, the “# of Items” column shows the numbers of questions testing each standard as well as the total number of questions for each strand and the “%” column shows the percentage of questions assessing each strand.


Test Preparation Tips

Months of classroom lessons, homework assignments, flashcard drills, study groups, and practice exams lead to testing season for Grenada Elementary School District’s K-8 students.

Throughout the school year, teachers focus instruction on state standards at every grade level and help students prepare for a variety of tests that show whether they have met those standards. Some tests are federal- or state-mandated, some district-mandated and some optional. Two of the most important testing programs are California’s Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program for grades 2-11, administered March through June, and the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE), offered multiple times in high school and which must be passed to meet graduation requirements.

“Making sure students are in school to participate in testing is key,” says Dr. Karen Bachofer, Executive Director of the district’s Standards, Assessment and Accountability Division, “STAR and CAHSEE testing are requirements of both the federal and state accountability systems. In addition, assessment results give parents important information about their students’ progress, help teachers to focus on students’ areas of need, and enable the district to determine which programs are most effective in helping all students meet grade level standards.”

Parents play a key role in helping students succeed in school and do well at test time, whether it’s encouraging a kindergartener in learning to read, or helping a college-bound high school student prepare for the SATs.

Here are some tips to support your student:

Months and weeks prior to test date:

  • Have your child in school on time, every day, and make sure homework is completed. The more time spent learning, the greater the likelihood that your child will do well on tests.
  • Meet with your child’s teacher(s) to discuss what you can do at home to help with specific learning goals.
  • Find out what tests and assessments are used to evaluate his/her progress.
  • Take advantage of study groups and workshops offered at school.
  • Involve the entire family as personal cheerleaders for the test taker.

The night before and day of the test:

  • Be encouraging – let your child know you think he/she will do well on the test.
  • Avoid difficult family issues before the test to prevent unnecessary anxiety.
  • Make sure your child gets plenty of sleep the night prior. On test day, have him/her wake up early, eat a nutritious breakfast and wear comfortable clothing.

After the test:

  • Commend your child for doing his/her best on the test.
  • Talk about what was learned on the test and how to improve performance the next time.
  • When you receive results, don’t compare performance with siblings or friends. Congratulate high scores and improvements.
Testing Helpful Hints Power Point Presentation
 
To view the presentation click  Helpful Hints.

Five Helpful Hints

Make Test Taking Day a Little Easier with the Following Five Helpful Hints:

Tip One
Weeks and days prior to major tests, take practice tests. Actually taking tests may help student remember the content better than a review. The key is that students must get feedback on the incorrect answers. Otherwise, they may not benefit from practice tests. Students should describe what steps they took to arrive at the answer and what they would do differently next time.

Tip Two 
Teach students a few simple relaxation strategies and practice them during the practice tests. Several long, slow, deep breaths, followed by a positive affirmation: Just relax I can do this. By giving students something to say to themselves, they substitute this for an otherwise panicky or negative thought.

Tip Three 
Give anxious students (most will have some anxiety on testing day) 5-10 minutes to write down their anxieties and worries. This is a good example of creating mental and emotional space for thinking and recalling.

Tip Four 
Tuck a little note of encouragement into backpacks or lunchboxes. It's a powerful motivator for students to know someone has their back, no matter what their test score

Tip Five 
Encourage your students to eat a breakfast of complex, slow-burning carbs like oatmeal, whole grain toast, with a protein like yogurt, cottage cheese, eggs, bacon, or sausage. These kinds of food can provide the fuel necessary to perform well. Have kids avoid foods like fruit or toast (without a companion protein), and avoid a sugar rush from sugary cereals, and donuts. They need a steady supply of brain fuel for the duration of the test. Have students practice this nutritional intake before testing day if possible. Sleep patterns are also important. Sleepy brains are poor at using glucose. Encourage students to build up some hours in their sleep bank prior to testing day, in case they don't sleep very well the nights before testing.

Good luck!

The five basic testing tricks:

One:  The "look alike trick"- the answer looks almost correct. 

Two:  The "opposite trick"- the correct answer is the opposite of the wrong one. 

Three:  The "directions trick." Notice small words in the directions such as: incorrect, correct, not, likely, best or most. It is important to remember "little words mean a lot." 

Four:  The "missed a step" trap. Remember to follow each and every step.

Five:  Identify "confusing" graphics or wording. 

 

 

Tips for the California Standards Test on Language Arts

The California Standards Test in English language arts has multiple choice and writing components.

The California Standards Tests (CSTs) are part of the state's Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) program. CST's were created by test developers specifically for the educational needs and requirements of California. The tests measure students' achievement levels against the state academic standards in English language arts study, as well as in other academic subjects. Students from grades 2 to 11 take the CSTs. The tests include multiple choice and writing components.

Memorize Words and Definitions

  • The CST for English language arts has a word analysis component in the multiple choice section of the exam. Word analysis includes selecting the most accurate definition of the given word, as well as using the most appropriate word in a given sentence. Memorizing word lists and definitions can help students better understand the vocabulary required for their grade level. Making cue cards with individual words written on them is one study option.

Learn to Read Critically

  • Learning to read critically will help the student navigate the multiple choice reading comprehension portion of the test. Reading critically forces the student to question the material by asking questions such as "what is the topic of the reading?," "what issues are being addressed?" and "what are the author's reasons for his statement or belief?" Reading critically will help the student discern among a number of options to choose the answer that best fits the question. This is important because the answers available may not necessarily be entirely correct, but may simply represent the best option.

Organize Your Writing

  • Learning writing strategies such as how to organize an answer and create appropriate sentence structure will help a student with the writing component of the language arts CST. Deciding how to organize an answer in advance is useful because it helps the student to present the material in a succinct and clear fashion and write quickly. Word lists are also useful here because they help with spelling, an important component of the writing portion of the exam.

Take Some Practice Tests

  • Sample tests available for students (see Resources) include word comprehension and reading analysis sections as well as sample writing questions. Taking these practice tests throughout the study period will help students familiarize themselves with the organization and tone of the exam, as well as giving them experience with the types of questions they will face when taking the test. Taking the practice tests will also allow students and teachers to assess problem areas as well as student progress.

How to Help Your Child Prepare for the California STAR Test (Math)

How to prepare your child for the Math section of the STAR test administered in California.

Instructions

    • Download the released test questions for your child's grade level from the California Department of Education - Testing and Accountability. If there is no direct link, just go to the web site and search on released test questions for your year. Bookmark the questions and the curriculum guidelines for future reference. Consider purchasing a Spectrum Test Prep book (California State) for your child's grade level.
    • Focus on one question type per day. Do the easy questions first. Do a little bit every day.
    • Fix concept related mistakes. This may be your child's first time learning about this topic. Review the curriculum guidelines. Look for free online videos and games that teach the topic. Find a workbook which explains/teaches this topic in detail. See, e.g., Schoolzone (easy/basic presentation), Singapore Math (CA curriculum) (more challenging).
    • 4 Teach the five basic STAR testing tricks. First, the "look alike trick"- the answer looks almost correct. Second, the "opposite trick"- the correct answer is the opposite of the wrong one. Third, the "directions trick." This is a failure of the student to notice small words in the directions such as: incorrect, correct, not, likely, best or most. Here it is important to explain and repeat that "little words mean a lot." Fourth, the "missed a step" trap. This is a failure to do all steps. Trick five is identifying "confusing" graphics or wording. Have your child make up a "trick" question using the same type of trick in the test. Make a game of seeing if your student can trick you or someone else. Giving each type of error a name that your child can use and understand will accelerate the learning process.
    • Praise your child, and yourself, each day for trying your best.

Web sites to help you review for Testing

QuizHub: takes you to a variety of sites for different types of help on all topics: http://quizhub.com/quiz/quizhub.cfm

Grammar:  This site has lots of help for grammar: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/

Windows to the Universe:  Interactive and informational pages, along with links on a WIDE variety of earth science topics. http://www.windows.ucar.edu/

Helpful Hints to Make TESTING Day Less Stressful: Follow this to some simple steps to make your test day less stressful and your results more successful! Helpful Hints